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talks that resumed in geneva today between iran and six world powers, including the u.s. is the second round of negotiations on iran's nuclear program since president hassan rouhani took office in august. the proposal would partially with u.s.-led sanctions for six months in return for iran's suspension of nuclear activity. john kerry continues a visit to israel and the occupied west bank in a bid to encourage u.s.- brokered peace talks. he faced palestinian complaints in ramallah on tuesday over israel's continued expansion of west bank settlements. in a rare move, john kerry said the u.s. views israel settlements as illegitimate, going beyond the normal white house language of not helpful. but john kerry stopped short of calling the settlements illegal. >> let me emphasize at this point the position of the united states of america on the considerts is that we now, and have always considered, the settlements to be illegitimate. i want to make it extremely clear that at no time did the agree asans in any way a matter of going back to the talks that they someh condone or
space. u.s. military planes fly over china's newly claimed air defense zone. >> the supreme court weighs in over obamacare contraceptives - they'll decide if private companies must pay for birth controls even if they have religious objections >> pope francis - he says it's time the faithful help those in need. >>> welcome to al jazeera america. tens of millions of people on the east coast are in the grips of a massive storm. conditions stretch from atlanta to boston, a mix of snow, sleet, ice and heavy rain. with each passing hour roads are trech ourous and flights are cancelled or delayed. we have a team of reporters tracking the impact of the storm. al jazeera's juan carlos molina begins the coverage on how the weather is hampering driving. >> conditions treacherous. the impact unavoidable. scenes like this on highways across america. >> i hydroplaned over here, came off and slid around. >> from michigan a close call from a dashboard camera as a truck loses control - barely missing a car. in flint the weather is blamed for multi-car pile ups. it's dangerous for drivers and emergency cr
keep the u.s. in afghanistan for ten years or more. >>> sounding a warning. from the faa, about what they see as a growing danger to modern aviation. >>> and a letter from jackie, seen for the first time, written to another woman who lost her husband to oswald's bullets that day in dallas, tonight, she shares her memory with tom brokaw. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. it was bad enough that a lot of bad behavior by big banks contributed to the great recession a few years back, sinking the finances of so many american families. it all started, of course, with the housing crisis and so many americans have been frustrated that it did not end with stiffer penalties for those who caused it. very few have paid any price at all for what went on. that changed in a big way today as jpmorgan has agreed to pay $13 billion to the federal government. that's the most money any company has ever paid to the feds. we begin there tonight with our justice correspondent, pete williams, at the justice department for us tonight. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening. and just t
square was young people texting each other and using their smartphones and the virtues of being able to text and delete and connect with people -- and tweet and connect with people. it brought about another revolution. the same thing with syria. no leader anywhere in the world can afford to look away from huge populations of young people coming at us in unprecedented numbers. it is a different world. it will change politics. all of them in touch with aspirations. it is a different world. what we are going to try to accomplish with two enormous and high standard trade negotiations that are underway right now is to raise the standards and the possibility for people that trans-pacific partnership represents 40% of trade. and we can lock that in, it will open up trade around the world. it is the largest market in the world. it will create an enormous transformation in the standards that people are practicing. it is the largest market in the world. those efforts will dramatically expand our market reach and they will strengthen trading so we can engage and race to the top. not a race to t
: delighted to be with you. >> host: you serve as ambassador to the u.s., pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. from 2008 to 2011. you advised the late benazir bhutto and you are now professor at austin university and the director of the south and central asia hudson institute. you write extensively for "the new york times," "the wall street journal" and the national tribune to name a few of the publication so you obviously have a very inside view of this relationship and i think just the title is strong of u.s. policy toward pakistan and in your words if i may quote you say the u.s. pakistan relationship, a tale of exaggerated expectations, broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings. i want to delve into what you mean by that a little later in the interview but first i want to ask you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> guest: this book has been on my mind for many years. i was a college student in 1979 when several of my colleagues -- i was in karachi in the south of pakistan but my colleagues as students in islamabad even in burn down the u.s. consulate the ho
get across because those people can use that and can get a lot of press, even though they have a very small following in the united states. while you can talk about the first amendment, you need to explain that these are not mainstream people, that what they are saying is not something that a lot of americans are people -- picking up more americans feel. certain ones do. the best defense is to be as open as you can about it, try to explain it, and in some ways that the message fall flat for the united states and say what effect does this have on what we do? often the proof is it has very little effect on us. but we are constantly dealing with those guys. it is troublesome. but we have to explain this is our society and how we do it, but look at the results. >> do they throw back at us the same thing of all the people who are nursing terrorism, you throw -- throw us all in the same basket? >> yes, we hear constantly how varied muslims are, and in the field you appreciate that. muslims are like you and me. they just want a middle-class life, get their kids educated and all that. a lot o
to a live picture of the u.s. capital. the house and senate both out for thanksgiving recess. president obama has ordered flags to be flown at half staff until sundown today as today marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of president kennedy. >> this weekend booktv is live in florida for the miami book fair international. coverage kicks off saturday at 10:00 eastern on c-span2 with dave barry, brad meltsir, lawrence wright, doris kerns goodwin, nathaniel of philbrick and call ins with peter baker and susan herman. sunday's coverage starts at 10:30 and includes john higher oilman and chris matthews. miami book fair international live on booktv on c-span2 and don't forget to weigh in on our november book club question, what books are you reading on jfk. post your thoughts any time on our book club chat room, booktv.org/bookclub. >> ladybird johnson was the first wife of a president to become a millionaire by investing in and running radio and tv stations in texas. watch our program saturday at 7:00 eastern on c-span, live monday night our series continues. >> the historic trip t
from guantanamo bay before he will sign the u.s. security packet. karzi's demands are prompting threats from the u.s. to withdraw all of its forces after 2014. >>> an overloaded sail boyt carrying people from haiti overturned in the bahamas. video released by the u.s. coast guard shows about 100 haitians clinging to a boat, believed to have capitalsized after it struck a reef in rough water. about 110 people have been rescued so far including 19 women. and those are the headlines of this hour. tony harris. more news. "inside story" is next. >> the u.s. plays hardball with hamid karzai. sign the troop deal or we are out. i am ray suarez. >> that's the insi"inside story" >> america's longest war is almost over, but the transition to the next phase in the u.s.-afghanistan relationship involves a difficult diplomatic dance. the united states negotiated a deal called "the bilateral security accord" which would keep most troops in the country when nato's 75,000 leave next year. the deal hit a signnag. afghan president karzai presented a new last-minute set of demands. on this edition of "insi
on the day off that audubon leaders killed in a us drone strike of politicians across the political spectrum voice concerns that a future peace talks. take it off the airwaves protests in egypt as the socceroos boss and use its hugely popular tv show is scrapped. it's all prepared by the countries of the treaty does. all the top stories this is. some political some thank you very much joining us. we're straight to our top story the news that government and all the money today abducted and killed two french media journalists who were on assignment in the country know that the total emissions linked to look good for working for this tunnel sister radio station fuel costs one thousand adults aren't all i needed just conducted into the room of the rebel leader when they were grabbed by several men in their forties police found on the eastern outskirts of the doll. the remains of the committee's response before they kill in the french president that was funneled has expressed his indignation when he called him and his accent his son and his ministers for meeting which is set to take place too mor
extend the disability rights of americans to disabled people in other countries. the u.s. signed onto the treaty in 2009, but ratification the senate failed in 2012. this hearing is just over 2.5 hours. >> the hearing of the senate foreign relations committee will come to order. let me welcome our panelists and all of our guests who have come here today for this important hearing on the rights of roughly one billion people around the world with disabilities. let me quickly welcome three guests. among them, congressman tony coelho, who has been a longtime champion of the rights of the disabled. let me also recognize ann cody, representing the u.s. on three paralympic teams. she was also nominated to be the vice president of the international paralympic committee. she understands it is not just enough to make the stadium accessible. you need to make surrounding restaurants and businesses accessible, and we thank you for being here or your advocacy as well. i also want to recognize a leader in the disability community in macedonia. she is here to learn about transportation and independen
? can you give us any more feelings on that?you listed it as one of the , but can you be more graphic? can you give us any more detail as to the extent about the cuts to our military capability. -- our military capability? statess in the united and one of those involved in protecting the government's thetion when we published strategic defense and security review in october of 2010. remarks, in my opening the administration at that time, although there were some underlying concerns, they were persuaded that we were going to spectrum of full capabilities, that they were reassured that our defense spending would remain above 2%, certainly throughout the life of this parliament, and that the numbers we were talking about for interventions in the future were scalable. they were not as great as we have managed before, but they were nevertheless militarily significant numbers for continuing operations and for large single operations. i talked also about the niche areas. they were reassured may be surprised we were putting an extra $1 billion with this parliament and that money was going to
to the us denies access to suspect we get from a generalist he says he's gotten truth. us soldiers all to blame. the special forces and the translators were indeed responsible for these men's fate. the sun shows stay america belongs the state of emergency in its relations with iran. someone even tougher restrictions despite attempts to seal a new clear agreements plus the all day and atmosphere of fear within britain. we need to learn he was targeted by controversial british government campaign to out the illegal immigrants on top stories this hour. the he's been through it with his lp with international news and comment. an investigation into the killings of civilians in afghanistan with the drops off to the us refused to cooperate american special forces and suspected of the madness but investigators have been refused access to them everett of the men were detained during us raids in afghanistan border problems that result to the twenty twelve and feathery twenty thirteen. they then disappeared. tim doherty is what makes had discovered just several hundred meters from an american in
us. where do you think there's general agreement. second question, where do you think there's not agreement. and how do we go about reconciling that lack of agreement if we can. >> do you want to go first? >> senator carper, i think there is broad based agreement about the potential of a digital economy and virtual currencies, i think there is absolute agreement that there is enormous potential for social good, and that this is an emerging technology that needs to be protected. i also think there is clear agreement that we can't just ignore the misuse, and misuse jeopardizes the virtual ability of the currencies in the longer run. i don't think there is disagreement at all on those points. as it relates to areas -- i just don't think there is use for the laws at the exchange level. know your customer, those kinds of provisions. the greatest challenge, the greatest area we have to grapple with is how do we enforce the enforcement techniques. and the fact that this is a global phenomenon. this is something that was just issued in march of this year. the guidance that directors
check check >> the u.s. and afghanistan reach a tentative deal to keep u.s. troops past next year as av gab elders gather to talk about the agreement. no deal as world powers try to come to terms on a solution on iran's nuclear program. >> henry trey raydull takes a leave of absence to seek treatment after pleading guilty to the buying of cocaine. >> hello, welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy. a decision on the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan now in the hands of a council of tribal leaders. more than a decade after america entered the region thousands of delegates are gathering on thursday, known as the loya jirga. they'll accept or reject a security pact. u.s. forces that remain after next year will receive immunity from afghan courts - that was a key point. also - american forces will not target afghanistan civilians, including in their home. afghanistan will fund the forces. secretary of state john kerry clarified a key part of the deal. >> it is entirely train, equip and desist. there's no combat role for the american forces. the bilateral agreement is an effo
. it is really quite a mess. use a little bit extra time. >> . >> pittsburgh's thanksgiving snowstorm with plows, shovel, and a sense of humor. >> it is fun. >> it is fun. >> yes, it is fun. it is christmas weather. >> the storm that pummeled the mid section barrels east today, coating highways with a mix of sleet, and slushy snow. in washington icy roads snarled morning traffic. >> the road crews on 12 hour shifts to keep highways clear. >> the week of thanksgiving is traditionally one of the busiest travel periods of the year. the aaa estimated 38 million americans will hit the highway this week. the national weather service thinks the brunt will be over by wednesday night, or early thursday morning and that can help some dinner guests reach their destinations on time. >> i have a lot of people coming in from columbus, and al tuna pa, so they will be driving but they aren't driving until thursday. the pennsylvania department of transportation and he said you know despite the slushy weather we have. on the highways here in pennsylvania, dale? >> dianne joining us live from pittsburgh, thank you
drivers to drive cautiously and pedestrians when you're crossing the street to use caution. >> three deadly accidents involving people crossing the street in just two days. last night, a woman was killed crossing near monterey road and san jose avenue, when police say she was hit by a vehicle. the driver who hit her stayed and cooperated with investigators. >> the pedestrian appeared to be transient and was crossing the road in between the intersections. the driver of the vehicle did say she was wearing all dark clothing which made it very difficult to see her crossing the street. >> reporter: sunday night, a 15- year-old girl was killed near highland and white road after she was hit by a vehicle. san jose police say in both cases, the two victims were crossing the street, where they weren't supposed to. >> but that wasn't the case for little elijah. >> the little kid just died on the side of the road just crossing the street. it is wrong. >> reporter: the 3-year-old was in a stroller and in a cross walk. when he and two others were hit near washington elementary school. the little b
program uses sophisticated buy metric checks to decide who should get a handout of rations. it is a massive logistical exercise that costs $8 million a month. kenya has paid a heavy price and the time is now right for refugees to go. the reactions are calculated to make sure each person gets just enough nutrition to survive. earlier this month, the agency announced it was cutting food by a quarter, thanks to a budget shortfall. >> the reduction in rations has nothing to do with the agreement. it is just a coincidence. the refugees don't see it that way. for them, it sends a very clear message that both the kenyans have had enough of them. >> this man understands how his community feels. he knows are nobody who thinks somalia is now safe. >> i want to thank the unhcr and kenyan government for hosting us, but as a 11 gee leader, i don't think many are willing to go back. >> very few. i'm not sure any will go right now. >> if you want to get a sense of just how things still are in somalia, consider this. the place that refugees run to is always better than the home they've lef
obviously have an inside view of this relationship. and i think just the title is a strong indictment of u.s. policy towards pakistan. and in your words if i may quote, you said the u.s. pakistan relationship, a tale of exaggerated expectation, broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings. i want to delve into what you mean by that a little later in the interview but first i want to ask you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> as this book has been on my mind for many years i went to college in 1979 when several of my colleagues -- i was in karachi in the south of pakistan but my colleagues as students in islamabad burned dow turned dow. embassy and people at karachi also wanted to go and burn down the u.s. consulate. all of this was over an incident that had taken place in the holy place of islam. the shrine had been taken over by government and the threat americans were involved so people just went berserk. i was somebody that said we can't do this. we have to wait. we will not be able to unburden it to the next day if we find out that the americans are not invo
the one. annie. in the evening when the nurse took us to god that we have to love together the government and the sea missile sites and some underwear month when half the walk to get the teachings mdm. the us. all of them people confirmed dead and that if you look like in high end would damage estimated at nine million dollars p today was the theme of statism and feel good. go out to the muhammad. one of four consecutive year the story to mismanagement and incompetence in managing it had on a bottle. food cooking i thought the team and teams tell repeal will mute. up ahead the training is in the philippines up to super typhoon heidi on the country's does our street and see as confirming the death toll at two thousand three hundred and fifty seven. with that big a is pointing to take it implies be fun to be four thousand had been in to police the week off to the super typhoon paid tens of thousands of victims in the simple find them province's of bacon some are still desperate for food and all the basics hundreds of tonnes of aid from far and dana's standing on a t team and
think it is useful but not absolutely essential to the overall relationship. just getting the team together on the american side, which hampered its first few months, but i would not myself think that this was critical to the issue of inking forward. i think that has to be done to some degree by the prime minister and the president. they have little time together, so it is very much something that needs to be included in the regular meetings at the foreign secretary level and then at the theor official level, like political director and others in the foreign office. you have this overview of the overall relationship. >> well, that takes me rather neatly onto my next point, which is that sometimes we make a mistake in this country in seeing american foreign-policy as being monolithic, because you have a number of sources. you have got the white house, that you mentioned. you have got the state department. you have got the senate, the foreign relations committee. c, and youot the ns have got the pentagon. do you think that we have difficulty here in formulating policy when there are
of demands. it was during a last-minute meeting with u.s. national security advisor susan rice that karzi insisted the u.s. would need to start peace talks with the taliban and release 17 after gangs from guantanamo bay before the bilateral security agreement got his signature. over. >> if the agreement isn't signed promptly, what i said to the president is we would have no choice. we would be compelled by necessity, not by our preference, to have to begin to plan for the prospect that we will not be able to to keep our troops here because they will not be invited because the bsa will not have been signed. then the nature of our partnership and the investments difficult. >> the meeting with rice came one day after the afghan liter surprised both countries by delaying the bsa's package into law despite nods of approval from the loya jirga's assembly whose endorsement he sought for a long timi a long time. tra tra . >>> a loya juryin whether or n whether to give the immunity or not. >> he said he shouldn't sign it. his suggestionsor in april's national election should. he also told the loya
didn't sanction the use of force to break up the occupation of government buildings. thailand's been plunged into deep if that is done separately since the ousting of taxing than a minute to seek new in two thousand and six. he was later convicted of corruption and lives in self imposed today to see enormous influence over his sister's government. the white house says afghanistan's president of the con side has proposed new conditions and indicates he's not ready to sign a bilateral security deal promptly. the declaration follows his meeting with u s national security adviser susan rice in trouble. cause i told bryce rental afghan homes that have deceased and the us would have to demonstrate its commitment to peace before he resigned to getting the spoon the rice was cooked it saying that the pope said mitcham and the us would stop coming for a total collapse in twenty fourteen and leave afghanistan much is left iraq with no human soul mate under the tree presents. last week and somalia juggle national afghan governing and goals to continue to escalate the engagement and its on site
on japan. japanese officials plan to work with their counterparts of the us and other countries to have the chinese retract the measures. white house spokesperson josh earnest said disputes in the region should be resolved diplomatically. a pentagon spokesperson says us forces will not champ change how they conduct their operations colonel steve warren says us pilots will register their flight plans or identify themselves. the chief of japan's maritime self defense force says sts aircraft crews are responding coleen safely to china's creation of the arizona for the east china sea the chief of staff cuts though she counted told reporters that the maritime self defense force's watching design. the book anything in which china's declaration of an air defense identification zone and restrictions on flights that could lead to a contingency. it's a dangerous situation. on a ladder that under the circumstances it's important to show the strong alliance between the us and japan. japanese government officials are telling their civilian pilots the same thing they say airlines don't need to regist
>> in addition to announcing a review of u.s. ties, the pakistani government also summoned the u.s. ambassador to warn of a standoff and less drone attacks ceased. also financing the strike from the leading pakistani opposition leader imran kahn proposed a ban on nato supply trucks inside pakistan. ofn accused the u.s. sabotaging the peace talks. >> i feel sad that just as the dialogue was about to start take, those who are still part in the talks, were killed yesterday. >> the pakistani taliban has sayed asly picked kahn its new leader. the suspect in friday's armed attack at the los angeles international airport could face the death penalty for shooting dead a transportation security administration officer and wounding five other people. is charged with murdering a federal officer and committing violence at an international airport. the head of the police at lax described the attack. >> at 9:20 this morning, in individual came into terminal 3 of this airport, pulled an assault rifle out of a bag and began to open fire in the terminal. he proceeded up into the screening area wher
of of us in the near future is to universalize the protocols. we are working on expanding the applications and implementation. 2009, joined the iaea in there were 93 countries that implemented the protocol. now 121 countries are implementing the protocols. additional protocols are to exclude the possibility of undeclared activities. we would like to see more countries that would adhere to the additional protocols. where else we could do more or not, i think that the priority for us is to universalize or expand the number of countries that implement the initial protocols. unfortunately, because the questions are excellent, we will break off questions now. r> dear little -- leade references are a little uncomfortable, but i -- i'm jane harman. before becoming president and ceo of the wilson center two and half years ago, i served as a member of congress for nine terms. i met with you in vienna as part of a delegation in january 2010 just after you have -- had assumed the responsibility as director general. we in congress at the time knew three things about you, and they still apply. number o
. why are regular pakistani's upset with the u.s. instead of celebrating the death of a mass murderer. why does it seem america issen my number one in pakistan? florida atlantic's football coach forced out for allegedly using drugs. as america's marijuana laws are relaxed should the sports crackdown on pot go up in smoke? are we alone in the universe? scientists found billions of reasons why we may not be. i'm antonio mora. we begin with a poisoned partnership between u.s. and pakistan. a drone strike friday killed taliban leader hakimullah mehsud, before peace talks between the pakistan government and the taliban were supposed to begin. pakistan's interior minister accused the u.s. of tarting not the taliban, but regional piece. >> it was an ambush, not a fire from the front, an ambush. >> in washington, chairman mike rogers was all for taking out hakimullah mehsud. >> he's part of an haka ni network. this was a bad guy. by the way, there's information recently that concerned us about the safety of our troops. i'm a little better for our troops today than i did before this event happ
background, making her show the highest rated talk show in television history. oprah winfrey has used her influence to support underserved communities and lift up the lives of young people, especially young women around the world. in her story, we are reminded that no dream can be deferred when we refuse to let life's bstacles keep us down. [applause] >> the medal of freedom honorees, please. [applause] all right, that concludes the formal part of today's ceremony. i want to thank all of you for eing here. obviously, we are deeply indebted to those who we honor here today. we're going to take some pictures with them and their family members. the rest of you, i understand the food here is pretty good. [laughter] o i hope you enjoy the reception and i hope we carry away from this a reminder of what jfk understood to be the essence of the american spirit, that it is represented here and that some of us may be less talented, but we all had the pportunity to serve and open people's hearts and minds in our maller orbits. i hope everybody has been inspired as i have been in participating and bei
minister argued for a --e active western european we had theink example of the use of chemical weapons in syria and it was the american president who had to persuade prime minister cameron. prime minister cameron already saw the need for action. in both countries, public opinion was extremely cautious. a majority was opposed to any form of direct military action, which is what came through here. that was ultimately the reason why american policy evolved as it did. even before the american position eve alt, my immediate reaction -- evolved, my immediate reaction was that it the type ofange relationship we have with america in one go. watching the american reaction in the days ahead for the president felt it necessary to consult congress. had there been a congressional vote, it it would have been touch and go. numbers and the house looked to be negative. in terms of having the u.k. and ,he u.s. at a popular level there is quite a shared set of views in the world we are in after afghanistan. the house of commons vote as having a negative vote on the u.k.-u.s. relations. the u.s. was in th
to give us some perspective on the situation. isn't north korea on the u.s. state department list of countries to avoid for u.s. citizens? >> the state department can only advise americans not to go to certain countries, in this case north korea, but mr. newman had the freedom to go there if we wanted if granted a visa. he went via a beijing-based tour company. you can tell imagine that before they bring any tourist into north korea, because this is quite a type of specific adventure traveling, that they would warn people what to do and what not to do, and one thing they make very clear is you have to listen to your north korean guide. that was the experience we had ourselves. they tell you what to do and where to go, and you are not supposed to step out of the hotel room. >> so melissa what kind of recourse does the family have? >> unfortunately the family will have to wait and depend on the state department. this is something the north koreans will try to use to their advantage, perhaps to get food aid or some sort of concession from the united states. >> and the north koreans a
h. this is al jazeera. >> hello there, welcome our top stories. any deal keeping u.s. troops won't get final approval until after he leaves office. >> with all the news from europe, as three women are freed by police in london, after being held as slaves for 30 years. and no release, ukraine's refuses and drops plans for a landmark trade deal with europe. also ahead, go home. somali refugees in kenya have told they have to leave, they say that will put them back in danger. and on the frail of the lizard kings. the world's most notorious wild life trafficker. afghanistan's president has announced he won't sign an agreement to keep u.s. troops there after next year. they should support the deal, but that he would leave it to the next president to give its final approval. elections are due in 24 teen. one of the most contention issues in the security packet is giving u.s. troops immunity from prosecution under afghan law. as well as the right to self-defense. but only if forces ask them to, and finally troops numbers. if the draft is signed up to 15,000 american soldiers could stay
>>> talking tough on drones - thousands are expected in peshawar to protest against u.s. strikes on pakistan. >> opposition leader imran khan wants nato's routes blocked. he's calling for a strike. also coming up: heading to the polls in maurey tainia. the opposition boycotting. >> typhoon haiyan 's vulnerable victims. the u.n. calls for action to help the 4 million children affected by the storm. >> paper or toxic - the indian government made its choice clear, but so far it seems no one is listening. >> in pakistan thousands are expected to take to the streets of peshawar and are rallying in support of opposition politician imran khan who wants the government to stop the u.s. drone program in pakistan. kahn has given the prime minister sharif a period of time to act. he's threatening to close routes through his province. there is an alternative route. but it is bysier. we will hear more about the protest that will take place. >> yes, indeed. as you can see behind me plenty of flags. the people have started arriving. as usual, they are off to a late start. interestingly, as you m
it is mostly thank you very much for joining us. we begin with the news that iran and six world powers managed to clinch a deal in any of the sunday morning which will see it around. in exchange for the relaxation of such sanctions. us president barack obama says the agreement talks all towards developing nuclear weapons. the results in the creation of a more stable secure a middle east. the us second stage on kerry to is hating the deal with iran. he is called today that there's plenty more work still to be done us a contest. now really hard part begins. that is the effort to get a comprehensive agreement which rule of law are enormous steps. in terms of verification transparency and accountability. don't carry that speaking alongside william hague the british foreign secretary in london white house's official wanna give the president to barack obama has spoken to the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu about that deal with it the wrong of course israel had forced a considerable concerns about six months to more analysis now all those talks in geneva which await a bite of the bomb on me
-- for illegal uses. that can include outright fraud at best or it can include -- the u.s. house has the very strict used than what it was appropriated for by congress. violation of that can entail civil and criminal penalties. because the accounting is so opaque, it is impossible to tell whether there are anti- deficiency act violations and perhaps whether they are even widespread. that perhaps is a reason over the long haul that there has been resistance tearing up the accounting, because often it is experience -- it is expedient when money is needed to finish revamping a helicopter or installing something on a ship, they just can't immediately take money from the wrong account -- they just immediately take money from the wrong account and spend it on that. host: one of the key quotes in your piece is by then secretary of defense robert gates -- "my staff and i learned that it was nearly impossible to get accurate information to questions such as much money did you spend and how many people do you have." secretary robert gates in 2011. a c-span democrat on twitter asks, "is the
to does his support for the treaty. i know, that the secretary changed his schedule to be with us today. he's a keynote speaker at the disability-related event this evening in new york. we'll be excusing him around 4:30 or so do so. secretary, we're pleased for joining us. thank you for rearranging your schedule today. i will leave congresswoman duckworth to be recognized by senator dire bin. someone who has done a tremendous amount of work on the cannot of veteran's affairs and personal testimony about her personal experience as a wounded warrior is invaluable to the committee. i want to ask former attorney general who is here to discuss the practical importance of ratification, and let me also recognize his wife, jenny, who is accomplished in the field of disability advocacy. we appreciate you being here as well. let me ask dr. susan from the catholic family and human rights institute. professor timothy meyer, the assistant professor school of law. and michael faris to join us as well as they offer their views on the treaty. thank you, all. let me turn to senator occur bib. >> t
next on booktv she talks about the role of u.s. special operation forces in the world today and argues that they will be this country's primary military force for many years to come. she was in a special office in afghanistan in 2011. this is about one hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, good evening. i am the ambassador. my role tonight is just to host and nothing else. i am happy to have for another time in nine, ten months the women policy group at the croatian embassy. i'm very happy to have you here as frequently as possible, because these events are really very nice. i will say no more except we are happy also the embassies keep open in washington. [laughter] and while my pleasure and honor to have ms. linda robinson whom i met at georgetown? we shared one evening -- and i must say that probably i was the most attentive of all the listeners at your part of the presentation which has to do with what you are going to talk about tonight. so, that much for a knee. i am sorry that we have bring you from the food so quickly, but time is running. [applause] >> thank you so much, a
. statehood can be a fiction that hides dangers lurking beneath. all of these challenges will be with us for the foreseeable future. there is not a short-term vision to these are a first century threats. we must manage through these realities as we engage these complex problems. staying focused on our long-term interests and long-term objectives and outcomes. the imperfect outcomes may be the most we can expect, working our way toward the higher ground of possible solutions. leveraging all aspects of our power, we must multiply and enhance our efforts by working through coalitions of common interest like nato. this is in fact our future. just as we have done since world war ii, but it now may be more essential than ever before. while these challenges are not america's responsibilities alone, they will demand america's continued engagement. no other nation, no other nation has the will, the power, the cast the, "he, and a network of alliances to lead international community in addressing them. however, sustaining our leadership will increasingly depend not only on the extent of an great p
the core ally of the u.s. important defense and bilateral relationship we've had with france, united nations, germany. are you saying the u.k. is stepping back and germany might step forward? how does the french reintergracious affect this? >> i think it has been extraordinarily important. it has made france given it a sense of responsibility for what happens in the alliance. and made the alliance stronger. no, our relationship with the strong allies. and those that are willing and able to provide military capability is going to be key. a strong u.s.-est stone began alliance is great. it's important to the estonian and the united states. it's not going to -- can't be the be all and end all. our relationship with the u.k. our relationship with france, our relationship with germany. our relationship with italy, which has stood up every time when we rang the bell they opened the door. which is always welcome. and step through it with real capabilities. those are important relationships. and those countries will have to take the lead in providing the capabilities that are necessary for n
." >> this is bbc world news america. the u.s. agrees with afghanistan on language that would allow american troops to day past -- stay pass 2014. now they wait to see if the country's tribal elders will also sign on. >> we agreed on language that would be submitted, but they have to pass it. >> the next round of negotiations over iran's nuclear -- starts in geneva. trail, with the number of women at the top. >> for all our viewers in -- on public television in america and around the well. the united states and afghanistan agreed to the final talk -- security deal that would allow american troops to stay in the country after 2014. willkerry has revealed it now go before the grand council of afghan elders, the loya jirg a. not discussrry did details. >> we have agreed on language that would be submitted to the loya jirga, but they have to pass it. i think it is inappropriate for me to comment at all on any of the details. it is up to the people of afghanistan. >> john kerry there. for more on the agenda of that important meeting of afghan elders, this report from kabul. >> the delegates gathering fo
york: a tentative agreement allows for thousands of u.s. troops to stay in that country until 2024 training and assisting afghan troops. it does not allow troops to take on combat and needs to be approved by a council of elders. the u.s. and other world powers are in geneva discussing the nuclear program. the agreement an limiting the nuclear capability in exchange for easing sanctions is possible. >> the florida congressman that pleaded guilty to drug charges has taken a leave of absence, henry trey raydull was caught buying from an undercover police officer. >> bill clinton was one of 16 given the medal of freedom. others were loretta lynn, ernie banks, and media mooingual oprah winfrey. the medal of freedom was created 16 years ago. >> pat quinn signed into law same-sex marriage legislation. kentucky. explosive details of bomb makers that made their way to the u.s. consider this - how could the american government let them resettle in america? and paul ryan predict an end to the theatrical budget. will they produce one? >> a rod storms out of an appeals hearing. was it a stunt?
of rondo who picks the hawk on the netbook has depicted some of the most use in attacks against us forces in afghanistan. she financed all the girly bonding on the next book militant group has been shot dead in the pot this time the captain of a strong hamas militant sources told reuters. one source said the sea doo big gaudy skilled snowball. what's something that caught with its two other unidentified people. so said the body had been to what's in stock the utility consult with exactly that in two days. it would be nice to be considered. some boats stopped on sunday the base of the market based on the top gong. this is to what system of this. an unidentified man was shot dead two men on the site. as he plucked out of a block we can and will be installed. was it all the rain. somewhere so i don't think you think is the a i did a tiny creepy nobody was there that live on the third in the nato summit. for school setting where the ladies. just about as a community or typos but maybe it isn't a monkey but many. what's in the guardian a potent offense. this will tie this but maybe at the week
of the united states's closest allies. >>> election day for hondurans casting votes for change. >>> the u.s. and five other world powers announced a landmark deal today temporarily freezing iran's nuclear program. the six-month agreement in exchange for some relief from sanctions is the most significant compromise between the u.s. and iran since the 1979 iranian revolution. president obama hailed the agreement as the most significant and tangible progress of a diplomatic campaign. >> today that xloema diplomacy opened up a new path that we can verify iran's nuclear program is peaceful and it cannot build a nuclear weapon. >> let's bring in white house correspondent mike viqueira. mike, six months, that's the extent of this deal. what are world leaders hoping will happen during that time? >> reporter: at the end of that time, they are hoping they can come to a larger deal that will prevent iran from developing a nuclear weapon. they have instittuted steps that they believe will present iran from turning the corner. they call it "a breakout" to take the uranium and plutonium and turning it i
to their home countries and told to infiltrate groups in order to help us capture and kill al qaeda operatives. of course this was risky considering that these prisoners could remain on their deal with the us and instead turned to kill americans. but as the ap reports for the ci day that was an acceptable risk for the american which was never told the programme was one of the many secret trade offs the government maine on its behalf. at the same time the government used the risk of terrorism to justify imprisoning people indefinitely. it was releasing dangerous people from prison to work for the ci day. so to get a little more perspective on as i was going to earlier by colonel morris davis former chief prosecutor at guantanamo bay and currently a law professor at howard university. at first asked him if he had known that any of this was going on at the time well i'd heard rumors of the different programs to strawberry fields and penny lane is well that about time i came on board in september of two thousand and five these were the new boarding pass so they really did keep this under wraps wh
of reasons. >> can you say it one more time? >> i'm often, can really compete for the u.s. on a level playing field basis with everyone else said why don't we build anything? in fact, we felt a lot here and it's time it came from athens, georgia last evening because yesterday we cut the ribbon on a brand-new greenfield factory 850,000 square feet. 1400 people strong when it's fully operational at the end of next year. these will be small bulldozers and small excavators that were formally only produced in japan. we brought those to the united states for several reasons. one, we can compete from the base there to relate the ports in here and that production will stay in the u.s. in the exported to south america and europe. we feel there is a very good chance at a very good condition to not only build here, but compete to a u.s. base. a year ago we did the same thing in victoria, texas on another excavator plan. these are the large machines. 42 that 5010 machines that came in from japan that will be built in us for the first time in the united states and exporting to south america. some of that
am expert enough yet in the pending legislation to offer a specific use i will refer to secretary beers who i think knows it better. >> is that true? >> i have been at it longer, senator. [laughter] >> do you want to take a shot at it? >> as explored with senator coburn, i think what we need is for the liability protection to create the willingness for the private sector to share information about a data breach as soon as they experience it. them as quickly as possible and we can protect others as quickly as possible. protection liability is constructed -- i am not a lawyer, i cannot do find that in the legal terms that you all need to put into the law, but i -- we arewould be ready and willing to help with ethical assistance on trying to define precisely what it ought earlierlike as we tried with the last attempt to write the legislation in this body. mr. olson? >> i don't have anything to add on that cyber legislation. >> thank you. let's talk a bit about the lone wolves, american citizens, in many cases, that become radicalized, in some cases by traveling abroad and being expos
of us will want to -- in this season of her members we will always remember their service to our country. >> hear your. >> mr. speaker, in piece across the house will have memories of the nightmare unfolding across the bank. does the prime minister share my sense of his belief that a person such as -- responsible as he was for large sums of our constituents money was ever appointed to position of chairman? working out to to find out how on earth that happen? >> my honorable friend makes an important point. constituents across the house will have people who hold co-op bonds are very weird about what will happen to their investment but let me be clear, the first priority is to safeguard this bank and to make sure it's safeguard without using taxpayers money. that must be the priority. my right honorable friend the chancellor will be discussing with the regulators what is the appropriate form of inquiry to get to the bottom of what went wrong. but there are clearly a lot of questions that have to be answered. why was he suitable to be chairman of a bank? why we're not alarm bells rung earli
inside view of this relationship and i think just the title is a strong indictment towards the u.s. and pakistan. you say that the relationship, entail of exaggerated expectations and broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings, i would like to delve into what you mean by that little later in the interview. at first i'm asking you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> guest: this book has been on my mind for so many years. i was a college student in 1979. several of my colleagues, as in students, burned it down the u.s. embassy and people also wanted to go down to the u.s. consulate in berlin that done as well. all of this had taken place when the holiest mosque and shrine of government had been taken down. so people just went berserk. and i was someone who said no, we can't do this, we have to wait. we burned down the building, we won't be able to on verdict on the next day. if we wait, we could find out that the americans are not involved. because of that come i was always wondering why the pakistanis have this knee-jerk anti-americanism. because what
to support the women and men who are trying to move afghanistan forward. we will certainly, the three of us, be deeply involved in making that case. but we need a virtual army now that the real army is leaving, we need a virtual army to help us make the case and to build that awareness here in the united states and around the world. [ applause ] >> well, thank you to you both, mrs. bush, secretary clinton. thank you for all you've done. thank you for all you will surely continue to do. thank you for being an extraordinary bipartisan face on an issue that has no partisanship. >> we're live on capitol hill for the hearing on development of virtual currencies. what current and potential uses will be. we'll hear how national security issues could be affected by those currencies. at this hearing held by the senate banking committee. we see the chairman of the committee, senator jeff merkel from oregon seated there. i want to read the story about another hearing yesterday said virtual currency bitcoin took a big step towards mainstream as federal authorities signaled their willingness to accept i
. republicans have been using the former rule that required 50 results to hold up judicial nominations. afghanistan's president says he does not trust the united states. he spoke as afghan leaders consider add proposed security packet, with the u.s. if the deal is reached thousands of u.s. troops can remain in afghanistan after 2014. and the pilot who landed a boeing dream liner at the wrong kansas airport, says he was confused. the huge plane arrived at its original destination today. an air force base in wichita, last night the pilot mistakenly landed on a shorter tarmac nine miles away, no passengers were onboard. those are the headlines at this hour, america tonight is up next, i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern time, 8:00 pacific, and remember you can all get the latest news on aljazeera.com. only america tonight, dieing to quit. a man leads police on a high speed chase. >> a woman gets locked up in a psychiatric ward. >> i started walking around the house, scheming, yelling. >> both blame the stop smoking drug chantax. our investigation reveals an alarming number of dangerou
-product of that plant they produce plutonium. that is a very dangerous substance. it's used in dirty bombs and other nuclear weapons systems. those two things going forward for the p5+1 are what they are deeply concerned about. it does look as show we are wrapping things up here. we hope to hear very soon where things stand. >> phil ittner. thank you very much. let's wrap this up for a moment. negotiations appears to be gaining momentum. iran said there is accomplices they simply will not budge. they said that they will not compromise on the red line, it's right to enrich uranium. the united states and other powers say there is no right to enrich. iran said it wants to use enriched uranium for medical and research purposes but that can also be used to nuclear weapons. which is why leaders want to say they want to stop that. the p5+1 wants iran to allow greater access to its facility. iran wants the economic sanctions to end. >>> afghanistan's loya jirga or tribal council continue to deliberate it's future. >> reporter: today was the final day for delegates at the jirga to study and debate this bilat
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